more clients for mpd.

Here are some more clients that you can use with mpd.

sudo yum install mpd mpc qmpdclient.x86_64 gmpc.x86_64 sonata.x86_64

mpd is ::

Music Player Daemon (MPD) is a flexible, powerful, server-side application for
playing music. Through plugins and libraries it can play a variety of sound
files (e.g., OGG, MP3, FLAC, AAC, WAV) and can be controlled remotely via its
network protocol. It can be used as a desktop music player, but is also great
for streaming music to a stereo system over a local network. There are many
GUI and command-line applications to choose from that act as a front-end for
browsing and playing your MPD music collection.

And setup is quite simple, install with above command then simply, configure your user and Music directory in the mpd config file /etc/mpd.conf.

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Music players on Linux – the poor mans random song player.

If you have more applications running on your system then your system can handle them then you know what I mean when I say that the Music Players take a lot of CPU. Otherwise harmless, but when you are doing too many things, then lot of times you would feel that probably stopping the Music player might help. But then Linux is all about alternatives. So, there is a command line player called mpg123, which does not use so much CPU. But what about playlist 🙂

playlist="/tmp/playlist"
(find . -type f |sort -R) > $playlist
trap exit INT TERM EXIT 1 2 3 15
while read line
do
    mpg123 "$line"
done < $playlist

Just copy this to somewhere as .sh file or just type this in your directory of choice and it will play all the music in that folder in random order without hogging your CPU.

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mplayer – find all the installed codes for audio and video

MPlayer
Image via Wikipedia

Some time back, I was trying to find out all the codecs that are installed for my mplayer. These could be the ones that came with mplayer or the ones that I downloaded from the site and installed in the various directories.

I could not find a direct way to do this, until I found this:

mplayer -ac help -vc help

And here is the output of the command:

MPlayer SVN-r33996-4.6.1 (C) 2000-2011 MPlayer Team
Available audio codecs:
ac:     afm:      status:   info:  [lib/dll]
wma9dmo     dmo       working   Windows Media Audio 9 DMO  [wma9dmod.dll]
wmadmo      dmo       working   Windows Media Audio DMO  [wmadmod.dll]
wma9spdmo   dmo       working   Windows Media Audio 9 Speech DMO  [wmspdmod.dll]
wma9spdshow dshow     working   Windows Media Audio 9 Speech DShow  [wmavds32.ax
]
ffqdm2      ffmpeg    working   FFmpeg QDM2 audio  [qdm2]
qdmc        qtaudio   working   QuickTime QDMC/QDM2 audio  [QuickTime.qts]
ffqclp      ffmpeg    working   FFmpeg QCLP audio  [qcelp]
qclp        qtaudio   working   QuickTime QCLP audio  [QuickTime.qts]
qtmace3     qtaudio   working   QuickTime MACE3 audio  [QuickTime.qts]
qtmace6     qtaudio   working   QuickTime MACE6 audio  [QuickTime.qts]
zygoaudio   qtaudio   working   Zygo audio  [ZyGoAudioS.qtx]
ffra144     ffmpeg    working   FFmpeg RealAudio 1.0  [real_144]
.....
Available video codecs:   
vc:     vfm:      status:   info:  [lib/dll]
ffanm       ffmpeg    working   FFmpeg Deluxe Paint Animation  [anm]
ffbinkvideo ffmpeg    working   FFmpeg Bink Video  [binkvideo]
ffcdgraphics ffmpeg    working   FFmpeg CD-Graphics  [cdgraphics]
ffmvi1      ffmpeg    working   FFmpeg Motion Pixels  [motionpixels]
ffmdec      ffmpeg    working   FFmpeg Sony PlayStation MDEC (Motion DECoder)  [mdec]
ffsiff      ffmpeg    working   FFmpeg Beam Software SIFF  [vb][/vb]
ffmimic     ffmpeg    working   FFmpeg Mimic video  [mimic]
.......

And if you wanted to see only the audio codecs:

mplayer -ac help

or just the video codecs:

mplayer -vc help
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